It’s that time of year again.

Halloween is not such a big deal here in Europe as it is in the States, but there is an interesting crossover. The day after October 31st is The Day of the Dead, celebrated in many cultures with a visit to the graveyard, to pay homage to our ancestors. People picnic in cemeteries, light candles and sing songs, including the dearly departed in the party.

Spooky stories and chills up the spine are on my mind.

Last night, Herr Husband and I watched Dressed To Kill, directed by Brian de Palma, starring Angie Dickinson and Michael Caine. Entertaining, definitely. Dated, absolutely. Scary, not in the slightest.

This weekend, I ticked two psychological thrillers off my TBR list, in which the protagonists are not monsters, but perfectly ‘normal’ high-achievers with an obsession. Both very scary.

A brilliant friend introduced me to the concept of All Hallows Read, via the fabulous Neil Gaiman. On Oct 31, we’ll be at our local bookshop introducing stories instead of sweeties and setting light to imaginations. The team pooled our scariest favourites and some have haunted me for days.

When I was little, a book scared me so much I asked my mother to get rid of it. She agreed, concerned at my extreme tearful reaction. Convinced it was still in the house, I searched everywhere until I found it in the attic. I smuggled it out of the house and threw it on the bonfire.

While I recall what disturbed me so deeply, I can’t remember the title. Since then, I prefer to read books that thrill and chill but just as I’d rather not see certain images on screen, I’d prefer not to admit certain concepts to my head.

My favourite spooky stories leave gaps – enough for you to get scared, but not scarred. A few examples:

The Little Stranger, by Sarah Waters

The Case of Charles Dexter Ward, by HP Lovecraft

Coraline, by Neil Gaiman

The Bloody Chamber, by Angela Carter

What are yours?

 

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